The Scarecrow’s Hat

Back when I was working on my AMS credential, I had a literary assignment where I was required to create props to reenact the story with the children (This is a simplified explanation of the assignment). I chose the story The Scarecrow’s Hat by Ken Brown. It’s a wonderful fictional story about a scarecrow who wants to trade his hat for a walking stick to rest his tired arms. Chicken would love to have scarecrow’s hat, but she doesn’t have a walking stick so she visits badger. Badger has a walking stick that he would like to trade for some ribbon. Chicken then visits a series of animals who are all willing to trade something they have for something they want. Chicken finally meets a donkey and is able to make a trade with him. Then she re-visits all the other animals, making a series of trades that meet everyone’s needs. In the end, she gets the scarecrow’s hat and the scarecrow gets his walking stick.

To make my props, I traced each animal in the story as best as I could. I then cut each animal out of felt. The birds in the story took the longest to make. I remember being up past two in the morning hot gluing feathers to felt.

The end product:

The animals that kept me awake most of the night.

The animals that kept me awake most of the night.

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Doll glasses from Micheal’s Craft Store

Tonight I was browsing a few Montessori blogs and I found that in 2008 http://mymontessorijourney.typepad.com posted their prop idea to go along with The Scarecrow’s Hat. Here is a picture from their blog:

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http://mymontessorijourney.typepad.com/my_montessori_journey/montessorigroup_activities/page/4/

I thought that their prop idea was simply delightful. The idea of using pictures to represent the animals never even dawned on me! (I tend to over-think a lot of things) So, if you are interested in presenting The Scarecrow’s Hat to your class it may be easier to follow their example rather than to sit up hot gluing feathers until the middle of the night. 🙂

 

 

Hello!! Pirate Ship Counters Lesson (Math/Numeration)

Hello! My name is Sara White. Over the last few months I have been working hard to create an authentic home-based Montessori program. I completed the internship required for my Montessori credential in May of 2012. I was planning to use my training to home school my son. However, a friend of mine suggested that I share my knowledge of Montessori education with others in the community. She encouraged me to work towards opening my own home-based program and now it has come to fruition!

While I have been creating my curriculum for the upcoming school year I have found a number of wonderful blogs from both Montessori home schooling moms and Montessori educators. They all have been so gracious to share their brilliantly creative ideas and so I have been inspired to begin sharing some of my own ideas and lessons.

Since this is my first blog entry, I will start by sharing one of the math lessons I created during my Montessori training. The purpose of the lesson is to work on one-to-one correspondence with numbers 1 through 10.

Pirate Ship Pirate Ship Lesson

I bought a pirate ship bird feeder from Micheal’s Craft Store and painted it. Micheal’s also happened to have some prepainted wooden treasure chests and I affixed numbers 1 through 10  on them using some small number stickers that are usually used for mailboxes and such. I then purchased some plastic “gold” coins from Oriental Trading Company to be used as counters, although I was thinking some “jewels” or “pearls” would be nice too. OTC was also selling some paper treasure map placemats and I had one laminated and used it to line the bottom of the lesson tray.

Wooden treasure chests from Michael's.

Wooden treasure chests from Michael’s.

"Gold" coins from Oriental Trading Company.

“Gold” coins from Oriental Trading Company.

Treasure map placemat from Oriental Trading.

Treasure map placemat from Oriental Trading.

My own little draw string booty bag to hold the coins.

My own little draw string booty bag to hold the coins.